Course Description Information

The course descriptions that are listed below provide information about the content of the course(s). The courses are listed in alphabetical order.

The term prerequisite refers to a course that must be taken prior to the course listed. Corequisite refers to a course that must be taken at the same time as another course.

The courses have a three-letter sequence followed by three numbers and the name of the course. Each course has a series of numbers that defines the course. The first number represents the number of lecture hours per week; the second represents the number of lab hours; the third number presents the clinical hours per week; the last number represents the number of credit hours assigned to the course.

 

CIS 110   Intro to Computers     2-2-3
2= class hours per week
2= lab hours per week
3= credit hours for the course
 

 

General Education Core (40 Semester Hours)

ENG 111      College Composition      (3-0-3)
First year composition writing. Introduction to rhetoric and college-level writing, reading, and thinking. Students develop individual writing process, research, and self-assessment strategies.


MAT 151      Survey of Mathematics      (3-0-3)
This course provides an introduction in a non-technical setting to selected topics in mathematics. Topics include, but are not limited to, sets, logic, probability, statistics, matrices, mathematical systems, geometry, topology, mathematics of finance, and modeling.


CIS  110      Intro to Computers      (2-2-3)
Overview of computers and information technology, including history, terminology, and ethical issues. Use of application software for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, email, network browsers, presentation graphics software, and web design.


ORI  101      Orientation to College Success      (1-0-1)                     
Instruction in the utilization of essential learning strategies to promote collegiate and lifelong learning. Personal habits of successful learners, academic ethics, time management, class discussion skills, and critical reading.


ENG 112      College Composition II      (3-0-3)
Development of writing skills necessary for academic work at all levels, including skills in rhetoric, grammar, electronic research, and documentation.


MAT 171      Statistics      (3-0-3)
Descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, probability distributions, correlation, regression, estimation, and hypothesis testing.


ENG 151      Public Speaking      (3-0-3)
Effective oral communication through analysis and practice of basic speech skills; control of vocal mechanisms; audience analysis; speech construction and interpretive skills of public speaking.


PED 101      Health & Wellness      (1-2-2)
This course is designed to promote an understanding of wellness and related behavior that contributes to a healthy lifestyle.


PHI 105      Critical Thinking      (3-0-3)
This course explores issues about the nature and techniques of critical thought, viewed as a way to establish a reliable basis for our claims, beliefs, and attitudes about the world. We explore multiple perspectives, placing established facts, theories, and practices in tension with alternatives to see how could be otherwise. Views about observation and interpretation, reasoning and inference, valuing and judging, and the production of knowledge in its social context are considered. Special attention is given to translating what is learned into strategies, materials, and interventions for use in students’ own educational and professional settings.


PSY 150      Intro to Psychology      (3-0-3)
An Introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Includes topics in social, abnormal, health, clinical, developmental, biological, and experimental psychology.


SOC 150      Intro to Sociology      (3-0-3)
Basic sociological concepts and processes. Analysis of human behavior in social structure and cultural contexts. Topics include deviance, change, and progress.


BIO 110      General Biology      (3-2-4)
An Introduction to the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, classification, and other related topics.


CHM 110      General Chemistry      (3-2-4)
This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stiochiometry, gas laws, and solutions.


BIO 151      Anatomy & Physiology      (3-2-4)
A basic study of the structure  of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the physiology of integumentary, muscular, skeletal, nervous and endocrine systems will be covered, as well as the basic chemistry, molecular and cellular biology necessary to understand the structure and function of the human body.


ART 111      Art Appreciation      (3-0-3) 
An introduction to the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principals to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting, and architecture. 


DRA 111      Theatre Appreciation      (3-0-3)
A study of art, craft, and business of the theatre. Emphasis is placed on the audience’s appreciation of the work of the playwright, director, actor, designer, producer, and critic.


MUS 110      Music Appreciation      (3-0-3)
This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective.


REL 110      World Religion      (3-0-3)        
An introduction to the world’s major religions Topics include important traditions, ideas, and practices of major religions in historical and cultural context.


PHI 210      Intro to Ethics      (3-0-3)
An introduction to contemporary and controversial ethical issues that face the business community. Topics include moral reasoning, moral dilemmas, law and morality, equity, justice and fairness, ethical standards, and moral development.

Core Business Courses (35 Semester Hours)

BUS 110          Intro to Business     (3-0-3)
An introduction to the study of business strategy. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Students develop an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects.


ACC 115          Principles of Accounting I     (4-0-4)
Fundamentals of accounting theory for sole proprietorships and partnerships. Classification of accounts; analysis and recording of business transactions; development of financial statements. Use of spreadsheet to organize data and solve problems.


ACC 152          Principles of Accounting II     (4-0-4)
Fundamentals of accounting theory for corporations; budgeting; process cost accounting. Analysis of financial statements and cash flows, including the time value of money.


MKT 120         Principles of Marketing     (3-0-3)
An introduction to principles and problems of marketing goods and services. Topics include promotion, placement, and pricing strategies for products.


BUS 201          Principles of Management     (3-0-3)
An overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating.


BUS 210          Business Communication     (3-0-3)                
This course is designed to develop skills in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on business reports, correspondence, and professional presentations.


BUS 215          Business Law I     (3-0-3)
An introduction to the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations.


BUS 216          Business Law II           (3-0-3)
This course continues the study of ethics and business law. Emphasis is placed on bailments, sales, risk-bearing, forms of business ownership, and copyrights.


BUS 230          Principles of Finance     (3-0-3)
An overview of business financial management. Emphasis placed on financial statement analysis, time value of money, management of cash flow, risk and return, and sources of financing. 


ECO 210          Principles of Economics I     (3-0-3)
An overview of the nature of economic choices as faced by individuals and businesses, basic supply and demand analysis, applications to taxation, trade, and environmental issues.


ECO 220          Principles of Economics II     (3-0-3)
Historical answers to questions of society-wide problems including business cycle fluctuations, data collection, functions of money and related economic institutions. Emphasis on ability to understand media descriptions of economic phenomena

Elective Business Courses (21 Semester Hours)

BUS 225          Essentials of Leadership     (3-0-3)
This course includes a study of the qualities, behaviors, and personal styles exhibited by leaders.


BUS 301          Intro to Human Resource Management     (3-0-3)
An introduction to the functions of personnel/human resource management within an organization. Topics include equal opportunity and the legal environment, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, employee development, compensation planning, and employee relations.


BUS 305          Retail Management     (3-0-3)
Retailing organization and management: including store location  merchandise management, expense analysis and control, and current issues and trends.


BUS 310          Fundamentals of Project Management   (3-0-3)
This course examines project management roles and environments, the project life cycle, and various techniques of work planning, and control and evaluation to achieve project objectives. Other topics include project initiation, budgeting, communications, execution, team management, control, and closure.


BUS 315          Business Analytics (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students, business analysts, and data scientists who want to apply statistical knowledge and techniques to business contexts. With this course, you’ll have a first overview on Strategic Business Analytics topics.


BUS 325          Entrepreneurship (3-0-3)
An introduction to the principles of entrepreneurship. Topics include self-analysis of entrepreneurship readiness, the role of entrepreneur in economic development, legal problems, organizational structure, sources of financing, budgeting, and cash flow.


BUS 320          Healthcare Management     (3-0-3)
The course explores fundamental concepts of management theory as applied to health care. Students will examine the organizational structure of the health care delivery system and administrative processes such as planning, problem solving, decision making, and quality productivity improvement. Emphasis will also be placed on the major issues and problem areas confronting health service administrators.


BUS 330          Gaming Management   (3-0-3)
This course is also designed to give the student a broad overview of the workings of a typical commercial casino environment.  We will review the history of legal gambling and how it has evolved into the present.  We will be reviewing the types of casinos, organizational structure, the financial flow of various departments, table games, slots, race and sports books, operational analysis, casino marketing, special events and the regulatory environment in various venues. 


BUS 335          Hospitality Management     (3-0-3)
An overview of facility operations including planning and design, facility systems, housekeeping, environmental, safety and security concerns, and resource management. Emphasis on organizational structure, divisional operations, and management responsibilities.


BUS 340           Fundamentals of International Business     (3-0-3)
Introduction to the context and operation of international business. Topics include international trade theory, trade agreements and blocs, international finance, global marketing, international human resource management and global strategy.


NPA 405          Fundamentals of a Non-profit     (2-0-2)
This course covers basic non-profit terminology and the purpose of the non-profit in today’s society. Students will come to understand what the product of a non-profit is, how it differs from a for-profit business, and its economic impact on the community where it resides. Students will learn why the bottom line of a non-profit is judged differently from a for-profit business, and what this means to a non-profit manager.

Accounting (29 Semester Hours)

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Accounting students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


BUS 460          Quantitative Analysis for Business     (2-0-2)
A study of the quantitative methods and data analysis methods commonly used in business. Emphasis on business application methodologies such as fundamental algebra, systems of linear equations, differentiation and optimization.


ACC 405          Spreadsheets   (3-0-3)
Advanced spreadsheet topics within accounting and business contexts. Focus on spreadsheet preparation and analysis to enhance decision-making skills related to all functional areas of a business. Examples include depreciation calculations, loan amortization schedules, and the use of pivot tables.


ACC 415          Taxation I     (3-0-3)
Background and history of income taxation; current income tax law, preparation of federal and state income tax returns. An examination of the federal income tax law and its application to individuals.  Topics include: an understanding of gross income, deductions, gains and losses, laws and procedures that apply to federal income taxation of individuals and individually taxed business entities.


ACC 420          Taxation II     (3-0-3)
Expanded study of federal tax laws affecting the various corporate entities, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Topics include: an understanding of laws and procedures that apply to federal income taxation of partnerships, S-corporations, and C-corporations, other corporate structures and tax preparation.


ACC 425          Auditing     (3-0-3)
Study of the independent auditor’s examination of the accounting control system and other evidence as a basis of expressing an opinion on a client’s financial statements. Basic audit objectives, standards, ethics, terminology, procedures, and reports. 


ACC 430          Cost and Managerial Accounting     (3-0-3)
A study of budgeting and policy-making, systems design, responsibility accounting and motivation, standard cost systems, variance analysis, cost behavior patterns, relevant costs, contribution analysis, and income effects of costing alternatives.


ACC 435          Accounting Information Systems     (3-0-3)
A study of accounting information systems with an emphasis on business processes, transaction initiation and recording, and internal controls.


ACC 440          Intermediate Accounting     (3-0-3)
Accounting theory and procedures, including inventory valuation, corporate investment, valuation of tangible and intangible assets, long-term debt, corporate capital, reserves, funds flow, and financial statement analysis.


ACC 445          Accounting Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Accounting that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the accounting industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Business Analytics (29 Semester Hours)

Connect people, places, data, and systems to change how you understand and act on information.                                 

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Business Analytics students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member. 


BAN 405          Fundamentals of Business Analytics     (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students, business analysts, and data scientists who want to apply statistical knowledge and techniques to business contexts.   With this course, you’ll have a first overview on Strategic Business Analytics topics. We’ll discuss a wide variety of applications of Business Analytics. From Marketing to Supply Chain or Credit Scoring and HR Analytics, etc. We’ll cover many different data analytics techniques, each time explaining how to be relevant for your business. We’ll pay special attention to how you can produce convincing, actionable, and efficient insights. We’ll also present you with different data analytics tools to be applied to different types of issues. By doing so, we’ll help you develop four sets of skills needed to leverage value from data: Analytics, IT, Business and Communication. By the end of this course, you should be able to approach a business issue using Analytics by (1) qualifying the issue at hand in quantitative terms, (2) conducting relevant data analyses, and (3) presenting your conclusions and recommendations in a business-oriented, actionable and efficient way.


BAN 410          Intermediate Business Analytics      (3-0-3)
This course will focus on understanding key analytics concepts and the breadth of analytic possibilities. Together, the class will explore dozens of real-world analytics problems and solutions across most major industries and business functions. The course will also touch on analytic technologies, architectures, and roles from business intelligence to data science, and from data warehouses to data lakes. And the course will wrap up with a discussion of analytics trends and futures.


BAN 415          Advanced  Business Analytics     (2-0-2)
In this course you will learn how to create models for decision making. We will start with cluster analysis, a technique for data reduction that is very useful in market segmentation. You will then learn the basics of Monte Carlo simulation that will help you model the uncertainty that is prevalent in many business decisions. A key element of decision making is to identify the best course of action. Since businesses problems often have too many alternative solutions, you will learn how optimization can help you identify the best option. What is really exciting about this course is that you won’t need to know a computer language or advanced statistics to learn about these predictive and prescriptive analytic models. The Analytic Solver Platform and basic knowledge of Excel is all you’ll need. Learners participating in assignments will be able to get free access to the Analytic Solver Platform.


BAN 420          Customer Analytics     (3-0-3)
Data about our browsing and buying patterns are everywhere. From credit card transactions and online shopping carts, to customer loyalty programs and user-generated ratings/reviews, there is a staggering amount of data that can be used to describe our past buying behaviors, predict future ones, and prescribe new ways to influence future purchasing decisions. In this course, four of Wharton’s top marketing professors will provide an overview of key areas of customer analytics: descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, prescriptive analytics, and their application to real-world business practices including Amazon, Google, and Starbucks to name a few. This course provides an overview of the field of analytics so that you can make informed business decisions. It is an introduction to the theory of customer analytics, and is not intended to prepare learners to perform customer analytics


BAN 425          Operations Analytics     (3-0-3)
This course is designed to impact the way you think about transforming data into better decisions. Recent extraordinary improvements in data-collecting technologies have changed the way firms make informed and effective business decisions. The course on operations analytics, focuses on how the data can be used to profitably match supply with demand in various business settings. In this course, you will learn how to model future demand uncertainties, how to predict the outcomes of competing policy choices and how to choose the best course of action in the face of risk. The course will introduce frameworks and ideas that provide insights into a spectrum of real-world business challenges, will teach you methods and software available for tackling these challenges quantitatively as well as the issues involved in gathering the relevant data.


BAN 430          People Analytics     (3-0-3)
People analytics is a data-driven approach to managing people at work. For the first time in history, business leaders can make decisions about their people based on deep analysis of data rather than the traditional methods of personal relationships, decision making based on experience, and risk avoidance. In this  course you will explore the state-of-the-art techniques used to recruit and retain great people, and demonstrate how these techniques are used at cutting-edge companies. They’ll explain how data and sophisticated analysis is brought to bear on people-related issues, such as recruiting, performance evaluation, leadership, hiring and promotion, job design, compensation, and collaboration. This course is an introduction to the theory of people analytics, and is not intended to prepare learners to perform complex talent management data analysis. By the end of this course, you’ll understand how and when hard data is used to make soft-skill decisions about hiring and talent development, so that you can position yourself as a strategic partner in your company’s talent management decisions. This course is intended to introduce you to Organizations flourish when the people who work in them flourish. Analytics can help make both happen. This course in People Analytics is designed to help you flourish in your career, too.


BAN 435          Accounting Analytics     (3-0-3)
Accounting Analytics explores how financial statement data and non-financial metrics can be linked to financial performance.  In this course, taught by Wharton’s acclaimed accounting professors, you’ll learn how data is used to assess what drives financial performance and to forecast future financial scenarios. While many accounting and financial organizations deliver data, accounting analytics deploys that data to deliver insight, and this course will explore the many areas in which accounting data provides insight into other business areas including consumer behavior predictions, corporate strategy, risk management, optimization, and more. By the end of this course, you’ll understand how financial data and non-financial data interact to forecast events, optimize operations, and determine strategy. This course has been designed to help you make better business decisions about the emerging roles of accounting analytics, so that you can apply what you’ve learned to make your own business decisions and create strategy using financial data.


BAN 440          Predictive Analytics     (3-0-3)
This course introduces students to the science of business analytics while casting a keen eye toward the artful use of numbers found in the digital space. The goal is to provide businesses and managers with the foundation needed to apply data analytics to real-world challenges they confront daily in their professional lives. Students will learn to identify the ideal analytic tool for their specific needs; understand valid and reliable ways to collect, analyze, and visualize data; and utilize data in decision making for their agencies, organizations or clients.


BAN 445          Business Analytics Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Business Analytics that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the business analytics industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Entrepreneurship (29 Semester Hours)

Nearly 90 percent of businesses in the U.S. have fewer than 20 workers and 9 million Americans are self-employed. Our program in entrepreneurship can equip you to understand the key elements of financial management, planning, and strategy for entrepreneurs.

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Entrepreneurship students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


ENT 405          Financial Management in the Small Business     (3-0-3)
This course focuses on the role that financial management plays in the development and sustainability of a small business. This course provides a detailed review of forecasting, budgeting, daily cash flow management techniques and monitoring financial performance. Specifically, students will address funding, debt management, cash-flow management, financial planning, and capital budgeting from the small business perspective. 


ENT 410          Business Law for Small Business and Entrepreneurs     (3-0-3)
This course provides students with an overview of the legal issues faced by small businesses and entrepreneurs. Students will examine the legal aspects of incorporation, human resource considerations, the regulatory environment, and legal business structures.


ENT 415          Small Business: Structure, Planning, Funding     (3-0-3)
This course provides an overview of the Small Business from concept through funding.  Emphasis on designing a competitive business model, crafting the business plan, forms of ownership and exploring funding options. 


ENT 420          Evaluating New Business Opportunities     (3-0-3)
This course focuses on evaluating the benefits and risks associated with new business opportunities. This includes reviewing the projected return on investment, the role of risk, investor considerations, strategic planning, and modeling techniques to analyze possible business ventures.


ENT 425          Small Business and Entrepreneurial Planning             (3-0-3)
This course focuses on the development of a strategic business plan applicable for the needs of a small business or entrepreneurial venture. This will include a strategic application of financial planning, capital management, marketing, people management, and leadership. Special emphasis is placed on adapting the business plan to the realistic needs of a small business owner and entrepreneur. 


ENT 430          Small Business Marketing     (3-0-3)
Knowing your customer, growing your customer base and creating a consumer driven culture are key drivers of sustainability in the small business.  This course focuses on the functions of evaluating opportunities, creating value, developing effective pricing and advertising strategy.


ENT 435          Critical Thinking & Decision Making in Business     (2-0-2)
This course explores the critical thinking techniques necessary to be an effective manager within an organizational setting. Students will focus on critical thinking and reasoning methods as they apply to management concepts within a work environment. Other topics include the use of critical thinking skills in the decision-making process as it applies for successful performance of employees and organizations and achieving desired business goals.


ENT 440          Statistics for Decision Making     (3-0-3)
This course introduces the use of statistics for business decision making. After completion of this course, students will be able to explain how to obtain a suitable sample of business data and evaluate its validity and reliability for statistical inferences, produce tables and charts to organize and display business data, interpret numerical business data using measures of central tendency and variability, apply fundamental concepts probability theory for inferential decision making for business, and perform trend analyses. 


ENT 445          Entrepreneurship Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Entrepreneurship that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the entrepreneurship industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Human Resource Management (29 Semester Hours)

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Human Resource students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


BUS 450          Managing Human Capital     (2-0-2)
This course focuses on strategies and tools that managers use to maximize employee contribution and create organizational excellence. You will learn talent management strategies to motivate and develop employees as well as best practices to manage performance for added value.


HRM 415         Employment Law     (3-0-3)
This course provides an overview of federal statutes and state-regulated areas that impact the personnel function. Among topics addressed are EEO and affirmative action, OSHA, ERISA, FMLA, and ADA; employee privacy issues (polygraph testing, drug and alcohol testing, employer searching and monitoring); and wrongful discharge.


HRM 420         Workforce Planning: Recruitment & Selection     (3-0-3)
This course focuses on building a highly skilled workforce by using effective strategies and tactics for recruiting, selecting, hiring, and retaining employees.


HRM 425         Training and Development     (3-0-3)
Training and Development focuses on the development of human capital (i.e., growing talent) by applying effective learning theories and practices for training and developing employees. The course will help develop essential skills for improving and empowering organizations through high-caliber training and development processes. There are no prerequisites.


HRM 430         Compensation and Benefits     (3-0-3)
This course explores topics in basic total compensation design and decision-making. It will provide the student with knowledge required for planning, developing, and administering total compensation programs that are compliant with government laws and regulations. Topics include: wage decisions, budgeting, benefits, incentive plans, and retirement plans.


HRM 435         Organizational Behavior     (3-0-3)
This course prepares students to understand the influence that behavior has on leading and managing organizations. After completion of this course, students will be able to describe the role of a manager within an organization, summarize key concepts and terminology related to organizational behavior, explain the influence of leadership styles on individual performance, examine the roles and interaction of group and team members, describe the relationship between job fit, job satisfaction, and job performance, and the relationship between the human resource function and organizational development.


HRM 440         Change Management     (3-0-3)
Change Management provides an understanding of change and an overview of successfully managing change using various methods and tools. Emphasizing change theories and various best practices, this course covers how to recognize and implement change using an array of other effective strategies, including those related to innovation and leadership. Other topics include approaches to change, diagnosing and planning for change, implementing change, and sustaining change.


HRM 445         Case Strategies in HR     (3-0-3)
This course focuses on strategic HR management and key issues that are opportunities and challenges for the HR function. The course explores how to align human resource management (HRM) with the business strategies, and the emerging issues facing business, and to understand the HRM competencies and leadership skills necessary to be a true strategic business partner. Students will examine what strategic HRM planning is and how to do it, as well as learning how to manage the necessary change in emerging business environments. The course will define the new roles and expectations of companies for the HRM functions.


HRM 450         HR Management Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Human Resource Management that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the human resource industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Information Technology Management (29 Semester Hours)

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Information Technology Management students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


ITM 410          Information Systems Management     (2-0-2)
Information Systems Management provides an overview of many facets of information systems applicable to business. The course explores the importance of viewing information technology (IT) as an organizational resource that must be managed, so that it supports or enables organizational strategy.


ITM 415          Business of IT- Applications     (3-0-3)
This course introduces IT students to information systems (IS). The course includes important topics related to management of information systems (MIS), such as system development, and business continuity. The course also provides an overview of management tools and issue tracking systems.


ITM 420          Fundamentals of Networking     (2-0-2)
This course provides a foundation in the basic telecommunications and networking technologies fundamental to the industry and to the broad field of telecommunications. Analog, digital, and radio frequency technologies are covered. Also covered in this course is an introduction to the OSI protocol model, network-switching systems, basics of wireless communications and network security. 


ITM 425          Hardware/Software Support                (3-0-3)
This course covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventative maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration and device-drivers.


ITM 430          Systems Analysis & Design     (3-0-3)
This course introduces established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of an information system. Emphasis is placed on system characteristics, managing projects, prototyping, CASE/OOM tools, and systems development life cycle phases. System analysis and design deal with planning the development of information systems through understanding and specifying in detail what a system should do and how the components of the system should be implemented and work together. System analysts solve business problems through analyzing the requirements of information systems and designing such systems by applying analysis and design techniques.


ITM 435          Database Concepts     (2-0-2)
This course will introduce students to the essential skills of creating, maintaining, and querying a database system. Basic methodologies for transferring data between a database and a program or web page will be covered. Also considered will be methodologies for database design to ensure accuracy of the data.


ITM 440          Operating Systems Concepts     (2-0-2)
The study of operating systems which are the primary resource managers of computer hardware. The main features provided by operating systems, including process management, storage management, IS governance policies, system acquisition policies and processes, and IS financial management.


ITM 445          Information Systems Business Concepts     (2-0-2)
Presents the role and responsibility of IS management in a contemporary business environment. Topics include risk management, IS governance policies, system acquisition policies and processes, and IS financial management.


ITM 450          Security Concepts     (2-0-2)
Presents critical concepts and skills that are related to protecting information assets from harm. Topics include the history of information security, basic security-related terminology and concepts, major classes of threats to information security, model strategies for protecting against those threats, computer forensics, and best practices in information assurance.


 ITM 455         Internet/Web Fundamentals                (2-0-2)
This course introduces World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standard markup language and services of the Internet. Topics include creating webpages, search engines, FTP, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to deploy a hand-coded website created with mark-up language, and effectively use and understand the function of search engines.


ITM 460          IT Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Information Technology Management that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the IT industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Management / Leadership (29 Semester Hours)

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Management/Leadership students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


BUS 415          Organizational Behavior     (3-0-3)
Successful organizations strive to hire the best talent and seek innovative strategies on how to retain them. Leaders attempt to create an environment that is appealing by soliciting feedback on what motivates them to stay. This course examines the field of organizational behavior and the various research strategies in areas such as personality, motivation, values, stress, leadership skills, power bases, and communication. It is designed to explore the attitudes and behavior of leaders and employees.


BUS 420          Becoming an Effective Leader     (3-0-3)
Provides a foundation in personal leadership development. Experience focuses on the undergraduate experience and preparation for career. The course also prepares students for skills in leading organizations: meeting planning, decision-making, team motivation and partnerships. Students identify, apply, and reflect on aspects of leadership development, including concepts of personal change toward effective leadership in a changing environment. You will learn how to influence followers, manage organizational culture, and enhance your effectiveness as a leader.


BUS 425          Leadership Styles     (3-0-3)
This course explores major theories for and approaches to leadership, leadership style evaluation, and personal leadership development while focusing on motivation, development, and achievement of others. You will learn how to influence followers, manage organizational culture, and enhance your effectiveness as a leader.


BUS 430          Strategic Management     (3-0-3)
This course focuses on models and practices of strategic management including developing and implementing both short- and long-term strategy and evaluating performance to achieve strategic goals and objectives. 


BUS 435          Leading Teams     (3-0-3)
This course helps students establish team objectives, align the team purpose with organizational goals, build credibility and trust, and develop the talents of individuals to enhance team performance.


BUS 440          Change Management & Innovation     (3-0-3)
This course provides an overview of change theories and innovation practices. This course will emphasize the role of leadership in influencing and managing change in response to challenges and opportunities facing organizations.


BUS 445          Decision Making     (3-0-3)
This course presents critical problem-solving methodologies, including field research and data collection methods that enhance organizational performance.


BUS 460          Managing Organization/Leading People     (2-0-2)
This course covers principles of effective management and leadership that maximize organizational performance. The following topics are included: the role and functions of a manager, analysis of personal leadership styles, approaches to self-awareness and self-assessment, and application of foundational leadership and management skills.


BUS 465          Management & Leadership Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Management & Leadership that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the management & leadership industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.

Marketing (29 Semester Hours)

BUS 405          Internship     (0-0-12-4)
Marketing students are involved in practical on-the-job experience in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member.


MKT 410         Marketing Applications                (3-0-3)
Marketing Applications allows students to apply their knowledge of core marketing principles by creating a comprehensive marketing plan. The plan will apply knowledge of the marketing planning process, market analysis, and the marketing mix (product, place, promotion, and price).


MKT 405         Marketing Fundamentals     (3-0-3)
This course develops an understanding of the complexities public and private organizations face in developing, establishing, and implementing marketing strategies in both domestic and international markets. Areas of study include: basic marketing concepts, marketing research, consumer behavior, branding, products/services, pricing, distribution channels, promotions, ethical marketing practices, global and multicultural marketing, and the technologies used throughout the marketing process.


MKT 415         Marketing Management Concepts     (3-0-3)
Marketing Management Concepts prepares students to learn core principles in marketing management. Topics include a wide array of marketing management concepts such as the buyer decision process, segmenting markets, competitive advantage, product mix management theory, price policy, distribution strategy, and sales management. This course is completed in conjunction with AST1.


MKT 420         Marketing Management Tasks     (3-0-3)
Marketing Management is completed in conjunction with ASC1. Marketing management concepts are applied to specific activities designed to prepare students for real-world scenarios. Topics include a wide array of marketing management concepts such as the buyer decision process, segmenting markets, competitive advantage, product mix management theory, price policy, distribution strategy, and sales management.


MKT 425         Consumer Behavior     (3-0-3)
This is an introductory course in analyzing consumer and purchasing behaviors as basic considerations in the development of a marketing mix. Economic, social, psychological, and cultural factors are considered as they relate to the development of marketing programs.


MKT 430         Marketing Tools     (3-0-3)
In this course, you will examine the tools available to you across the different areas of digital marketing, providing you with key insights along the way. Anson covers industry-leading solutions for social media marketing, email marketing, digital advertising, content creation, search engine optimization (SEO), and affiliate marketing. Upon wrapping up this course, you’ll be better equipped to navigate the world of digital marketing and home in on the best tools for your company.


MKT 435         Marketing Research     (3-0-3)
This course covers basic research methodology applied to marketing issues. Students study methods and techniques for collection, analysis, and interpretation of primary and secondary data for customer and business marketing.


MKT 440         Business to Business Marketing     (2-0-2)
A comprehensive study of the nature and scope of industrial or business-to-business markets: product management, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Also covers assessing industrial marketing opportunities and industrial competitive strategies


MKT 445         Marketing Capstone     (2-0-2)
This is a capstone course in Marketing that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific focus within the marketing industry. Current trends in the industry and career interests are explored.